Order the letter.

We are pleased to hear of your companys interest in purchasing our Axer 550S scanner.2 May 200. You asked about a quantity discount.Thank you for your letter of 15 May enquiring about our new scanner models.We will be happy to discuss this if you give us some idea of the quantity you are ordering.Sales ManagerOur terms of payment are 15 days after the receipt of invoice.Yours sincerelyMr J. CarmicleManagerJC Software19 Market StreetBrighton BN4 6CDWe would also like to draw your attention to our Packard 305C model which has just beenintroduced to the market.MB COMPUTERS25 Bayswater Road, Putney PT7 9DS, tel/fax 0432-243 8719, e-mail:Mary.Bates@mbcom.co.ukI look forward to hearing from you in the near future.Mary BatesDear Mr CarmicleDo not hesitate to contact us if you want to get any more information.Mary Bates

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6 Responses to Order the letter.

  1. Mr J. carmicle
    Manager
    JC Software
    19 Market street
    Brinhton BN4 6CD

    22 May 2000

    dear Mr Carmicle

    Thank you for your letter of15 May enquiring about our new scanner models.
    We are pleased to hear of your companys interest in purchasing our Axer 55os scanner
    your asked about a quantity deiscount.
    We will be happy to discuss this if you give us some idea of the quanity you are ording.
    Our terms of payment are 15 days after the receipt of invoice.
    We would also like to draw your attention to our packard 305C models which has just been introduced to the market.
    Do not hesitate to contact us if you want to get any more information.
    I look forward to hearing from tou in the near future.
    Yours sincerely
    Mary Bates
    Mary Bates
    Sales Manager

  2. martha elena says:

    CAUSATIVE VERB
    Causative verbs express the idea of someone causing something to take place. Causative verbs can be similar in meaning to passive verbs.

    A verb–such as cause, allow, help, enable, keep, hold, let, force, require, and make–used to indicate that some person or thing helps to make something happen.

    Construction
    Subject + Make + Person + Base Form of Verb
    Subject + Have + Person + Base Form of Verb
    Subject + Have + Object + Past Participle

  3. CAUSATIVE VERBS

    Certain verbs can be used to express a causal relationship between the subject and object in a sentence. Some of them require a “to” while others do not. Note the following patterns:
    With “to”
    S + V + O + to V (O)
    I allowed Jim to clean up the mess.
    I asked Jim to clean up the mess.
    I told Jim to clean up the mess.
    I persuaded Jim to clean up the mess.* Without “to”
    S + V + O + V (O)
    I let Jim clean up the mess.
    I had Jim clean up the mess.
    I made Jim clean up the mess.
    *Other verbs which use this pattern are require, command, force, order, remind, and urge. The verb help can be used with or without “to”: Help Jim (to) clean up the mess.

    The most common error with causatives is using “to” unnecessarily. For example,
    We made Kevin to finish his supper.
    We made Kevin finish his supper.
    They suggested Irene to take music lessons.
    They suggested that Irene take music lessons. (Incorrect)
    (Correct)
    (Incorrect)
    (Correct)

  4. MIRIAM says:

    Causative Verbs
    Jack had his house painted.
    This sentence is similar in meaning to: Someone painted Jack’s house. OR Jack’s house was painted by someone. Causative verbs express the idea of someone causing something to take place. Causative verbs can be similar in meaning to passive verbs.
    Examples:
    My hair was cut. (passive)
    I had my hair cut. (causative)
    Both ‘make’ and ‘have’ can be used as causative verbs.
    Make
    ‘Make’ as a causative verb expresses the idea that the person requires another person to do something.
    Construction Chart
    Subject + Make + Person + Base Form of Verb
    Examples:
    Peter made her do her homework.
    The teacher made the students stay after class.
    Have
    ‘Have’ as a causative verb expresses the idea that the person wants something to be done for them. This causative verb is often used when speaking about various services. There are two forms of the causative verb ‘have’.
    Construction Chart: Use 1
    Subject + Have + Person + Base Form of Verb
    Examples:
    They had John arrive early.
    She had her children cook dinner for her.
    Construction Chart: Use 2 Subject + Have + Object + Past Participle
    Examples:
    I had my hair cut last Saturday.
    She had the car washed at the weekend.
    Note: This form is similar in meaning to the passive.

  5. CAUSATIVE VERB
    “The convention in present-day linguistics is that a grammatical label should be based on a word of Romance origin–hence ‘causative.’ From this has arisen the misconception that cause is the protypical causative verb in English. It is not; make is. Cause is a causative verb but it has a more specialized meaning (implying direct causation) than make and it is much less common. Make differs from most other causative verbs, and from most other verbs that take to complement clauses, in that it omits the to in active clauses, although to must be included in the passive.
    Jack had his house painted.
    This sentence is similar in meaning to: Someone painted Jack’s house. OR Jack’s house was painted by someone. Causative verbs express the idea of someone causing something to take place. Causative verbs can be similar in meaning to passive verbs.
    Examples:
    My hair was cut. (passive)
    I had my hair cut. (causative)
    Both ‘make’ and ‘have’ can be used as causative verbs.
    Make
    ‘Make’ as a causative verb expresses the idea that the person requires another person to do something.
    Construction Chart
    Subject + Make + Person + Base Form of Verb
    Examples:
    Peter made her do her homework.
    The teacher made the students stay after class.
    Have
    ‘Have’ as a causative verb expresses the idea that the person wants something to be done for them. This causative verb is often used when speaking about various services. There are two forms of the causative verb ‘have’.
    Use 1:Subject + Have + Person + Base Form of Verb
    Examples:
    They had John arrive early.
    She had her children cook dinner for her.
    Use 2: Subject + Have + Object + Past Participle
    Examples:
    I had my hair cut last Saturday.
    She had the car washed at the weekend.

  6. Xochitl Hernandez Salas says:

    Causative Verb
    Certain verbs can be used to express a causal relationship between the subject and object in a sentence. Some of them require a “to” while others do not. Note the following patterns:
    With “to”
    S + V + O + to V (O)
    I allowed Jim to clean up the mess.
    I asked Jim to clean up the mess.
    I told Jim to clean up the mess.
    I persuaded Jim to clean up the mess.* Without “to”
    S + V + O + V (O)
    I let Jim clean up the mess.
    I had Jim clean up the mess.
    I made Jim clean up the mess.
    *Other verbs which use this pattern are require, command, force, order, remind, and urge. The verb help can be used with or without “to”: Help Jim (to) clean up the mess.

    Some verbs use the pattern, S + V that S + V (the second verb is in the base form)
    I insisted that Laura do her homework.
    I suggested that Laura do her homework.
    I recommended that Laura do her homework. (not “does”)
    *Other verbs which can be used with this pattern are ask, require, request, and demand.

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